Spotlight on Garlic

Garlic is low in calories and rich in vitamins and nutrients. Garlic is also delicious and easy to add to your diet. Use it in savory dishes, soups, sauces, dressings and more.

Nutritional Benefits

Garlic is rich in vitamins and nutrients.

  • Manganese: Manganese isrequired for the normal functioning of your brain, nervous system and many of your body’s enzyme systems.A 1-ounce (28-gram) serving of garlic contains 23% of recommended daily intake.

  • Vitamin B6: Vitamin B6 may prevent clogged arteries and minimize heart disease risk. Research shows that people with low blood levels of vitamin B6 have almost double the risk of getting heart disease compared to those with higher B6 levels. A 1-ounce (28-gram) serving of garlic contains 17% of recommended daily intake.

  • Vitamin C. This vitamin is an essential nutrient and antioxidant. A 1-ounce (28-gram) serving of garlic contains 15% of recommended daily intake.

Storing Garlic

Do not store unpeeled garlic in the refrigerator. Instead, store it in a cool, dark, and dry place in a well-ventilated container such as a basket or mesh bag. Do not store in plastic. To help prevent the heads from drying out, leave the papery skin on and break off cloves as needed. If peeled, store in an airtight container in the refrigerator.

Unpeeled garlic will last a few weeks up to several months. Peeled will last several weeks.

Cooking with Garlic

Garlic is a plant in the onion family. It is closely related to onions, shallots and leeks. Each segment of a garlic bulb is called a clove. There are about 10–20 cloves in a single bulb.

Garlic grows in many parts of the world and is often used in cooking because of its strong smell and delicious taste. Look for garlic sold loose, so you can choose a healthy, solid bulb. Garlic bulbs should be plump and compact with taut, unbroken skin. Avoid those with damp or soft spots. A heavy, firm bulb indicates that the garlic will be fresh and flavorful.

Try this recipe for Garlic Rosemary Pork Tenderloin with Roasted Vegetables. The recipe calls for 1 teaspoon minced garlic but if you’re like some people in our office you may double it! Enjoy!

Garlic Rosemary Pork Tenderloin with Roasted Vegetables

Ingredients:

1 pound Pork Tenderloin

1 teaspoon minced garlic

2 teaspoons dried rosemary

¼ teaspoon black pepper

3 tablespoon olive oil, divided use

1 pound Brussels sprouts, trimmed and cut in half

1 pound sweet potatoes, peeled and cut into 1” cubes

1 medium onion, cut into ½” wedges

Instructions:

Preheat oven to 350°. Line a large baking sheet with parchment paper. In a large baggie, mix together the minced garlic, rosemary, black pepper and 1 tablespoon olive oil. Add pork tenderloin to baggie and allow to marinate overnight or a few hours as time allows. Trim and cut vegetables and toss together in a large baggie with the remaining 2 tablespoons olive oil. Place tenderloin and vegetables onto the prepared baking sheet, season vegetables with black pepper and a small amount of salt if desired. Bake the pork and vegetables together, uncovered in a 350° oven for approximately 35-45 minutes or until pork registers 145° and the vegetables are fork tender.

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